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DETAIL English 4/2011 - Refurbishment

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A hotel in Shanghai revitalizes former docks, a supermarket is transformed into town houses, a textile factory turns into a museum of modern art – refurbishment and reconstruction shows the architect’s signature just like a new building.

Details

Refurbishment, reconstruction and extension of existing buildings offer architects a wide spectrum of different approaches and design possibilities: from barely noticeable changes to completely new interpretations; from energetic restoration of an existing facade to the revitalisation of the entire building complex. This DETAIL issue focuses on the contrast between conservation and renewal, between the authenticity of the building’s basic structure and its modern continuation, and shows nine exemplary projects. While the existing buildings, context and construction works are different, so too is the respective signature style of the architects, from the cautious extension of a protected villa to the restoration and upgrading of a Wilhelminian-style residential building in Munich. A hotel in Shanghai gives new life to old harbour storage halls, whilst leaving the rough character of the past untouched and enhances it with a contrasting extension. How a supermarket can be transformed into townhouses and a previous textile factory converts itself into a museum for modern art is demonstrated by projects from Winterthur and Barcelona. A hospice in St Gotthard and a holiday home in Norfolk serve as evocative interpretations of existing constructions. As the diocese architect for the town of Eichstätt, Karljosef Schattner devotes himself to the reflection on 50 years of DETAIL this issue. Insight into Toyo Itos’ thoughts and language of architecture as well as his realisations and future projects (3) are addressed in an interview that Christian Schittich conducted with the Japanese architect in Tokyo.